The Dodge Charger is one of the most popular muscle cars ever built. For the 1969 model, the Charger received a couple of improved design tweaks. A 1969 Charger was also featured in The Dukes of Hazzard as 'The General Lee'. This publicity created sales demand and in 1969, Dodge built an incredible 89,199 cars.

The 1969 Charger was available with engines ranging from Chrysler's little 225 slant-6 to the legendary 440 Magnum V8. Optional trim packages included the Charger R/T, the Charger SE, and the Charger R/T-SE. But every single 1969 Dodge Charger was imbued with a timeless, aggressive appearance.

Today, this second-generation Dodge Charger's distinctive "coke bottle" styling and available big-block V8s make it one of the most sought-after cars of all time. But with so many chargers built, there are still deals available.

UPDATED March 2022: There is no doubt that the 1969 Dodge Charger is one of the favorite model years that collectors hope to get their hands on. That is why the value of this historic muscle car goes up every year. In 2022, two years after this article was first published, the price of a 1969 Dodge Charger has shot up even more. Let's find out how much a 1969 Dodge Charger is worth today.

The History Of The Dodge Charger

Here's How Much This 1969 Dodge Charger RT Via: Skyclassics.com
Via: Skywayclassics.com

In 1965, the Dodge corporation could no longer ignore the complaints of Dodge dealers: they were getting killed by sales of the new Ford Mustang. Mopar corporation's Plymouth division already had its answer with the all-new Plymouth Barracuda. The dealerships asked Dodge for a Mustang killer, and hopefully something for a different market than the tiny, valiant-based Barracuda. Dodge's answer was the 1966 Charger.

The first generation Dodge Charger was designed around one of the largest fastback roofs and rear windows in the industry. It was huge, slab-sided, and boasted a premium interior. The car featured four bucket seats, a cabin-length center console, leather and woodgrain. The first generation Charger was an experiment, an upmarket car without the Chrysler nameplate, perhaps aimed at a younger crowd. And it was a roaring success.

The second-generation Charger was a legendary muscle car. For the 1968 model year, Dodge was determined to go mainstream with their Charger. They tapped famed designer Richard Sias who flared both the front and rear fenders dramatically. The result was a haunchy, hourglass-shaped monster, often described as having a "coke bottle" or "double-diamond" profile. The Charger was a 2-door hardtop that was 208 inches long and 76.7 inches wide, with a wheelbase of 117 inches. This second-generation Charger kept the first Charger's full-width grille with hide-away headlights.

Here's How Much This 1969 Dodge Charger RT Via: Skyclassics.com
Via: Skywayclassics.com

The same year, Dodge changed the Charger to a more conventional interior with a rear bench seat, vinyl mats, and a regular center console. Dodge even offered a budget-model Charger with the modest 225 Slant-6 engine. At the same time, Dodge launched the Road/Track performance package. In 1968, Dodge sold an incredible 96,100 Chargers.

For the 1969 model year, Dodge kept the "coke bottle" body styling. A designer named Harvey J. Winn created a new grill with a center divider and dramatic, longitudinal taillights.

RELATED: Dodge Charger: Main Difference Between The 1960s And 1970s Models

The 1969 Dodge Charger

Here's How Much This 1969 Dodge Charger RT Via: Skyclassics.com
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A few updates were made to the 1969 Dodge Charger. This included exterior changes including a new grille with a center divider and new taillights. A new trim line called the Special Edition (SE) was also added. The SE was available by itself or packaged with the R/T, becoming an R/T-SE. Dodge offered Chargers with either an automatic or four-speed manual transmission. The 1969 Charger Special Editions (SE) featured leather inserts to the front seats, chrome rocker moldings, a wood grain steering wheel, and wood grain instrument panel inserts. Only 260 Charger buyers asked for the optional sunroof. A sunroof was added as an option. The bumblebee stripes returned as well, but instead of four stripes, it now featured one huge stripe framed by two smaller stripes.

The high-performance Road/Track (R/T) package came standard with the 440 Magnum engine. The 440 was a mildly built engine with wedge-shaped combustion chambers that was powerful, reliable, and similar to contemporary Dodge truck engines. The 440 engine turned-out 375 horsepower.

R/T buyers could also opt for the higher compression race-tuned 426 Hemi engine (named after Dodge's proprietary hemispherical combustion chamber). The 426 Hemi churned out a whopping 425 horsepower. R/T Chargers also featured the Dodge Scat Pack bumblebee stripe wrapping over the trunk deck. Buyers could delete this stripe and Dodge fit their cars with a metal R/T badge instead.

Here's How Much This 1969 Dodge Charger RT Via: Skyclassics.com
Via: Skywayclassics.com

Finally, Dodge engineers created a 1969 Charger for NASCAR. The Charger Daytona was built with an 18-inch nose cone (providing 1,200 lbs of downforce) and a 23-inch tall rear wing (add 600 lbs of downforce). The Charger Daytona was capable of speeds in excess of 200 mph. To enter the groundbreaking car in NASCAR, Dodge needed to also sell them to the public as well. Dodge built 503 Charger Daytonas to sell in the U.S., and 40 to sell in Canada. Daytona's command quarter-million-dollar price tags and are considered investments as they are only going to go up in value given their rarity and historical value.

RELATED: Check Out This 1969 Dodge Hemi Charger Certified By Mr. Norm

The Price Of A 1969 Dodge Charger Today

Here's How Much This 1969 Dodge Charger RT Via: Skyclassics.com
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The value of the 1969 Dodge Charger has been increasing for years. The 2005 Dukes of Hazzard remake drove the value of the car up 64% in one year alone: the price of a pristine Charger R/T can from $40,200 to $100,000. You can read Kelley Blue Book's 2005 report here. After the 2005 spike, 1969 Charger prices have continued to march upwards. Today, J.D. Power's National Automobile Dealers' Association estimates that a pristine 440 R/T 1969 Charger with a manual transmission can fetch at least $46,500 dollars and an automatic transmission bumps that number to $57,105. Find out more on NadaGuides.com. Hagerty agrees that a concourse-caliber V8 car is going for $55,700 while a simply excellent car is going for $42,800.

Here's How Much This 1969 Dodge Charger RT Via: Skyclassics.com
Via: Skywayclassics.com

But with so many Chargers produced, many cheaper options are available. Some muscle car enthusiasts even buy base-model 1969 Chargers and upgrade them to V8 R/T "tribute" cars. Others build ground-pounding restomods. Many base-model Chargers in need of restoration are listed on Craigslist. However, on classiccars.com, you can find high quality 1969 Dodge Chargers ranging from $50,000 all the way up to $120,000.

With so many people who love the iconic 1969 Dodge Charger, these cars aren't cheap. But for the die-hard fans, these cars are priceless.

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